Standard Wood List & Information

These are the woods we usually have in stock.

American Black Cherry is a widely distributed hardwood of North America and one of the finest and most popular furniture woods available. The heartwood varies in color from tan to a reddish brown and darkens with time to a warm, rich, amber hue. The seasonal growth lines are wide and lazy, flowing in easy patters with subtle color changes from one band to the next. Cherry is moderately hard, has a very fine texture, and can be waxed and polished to a high luster.

Black Walnut is another widely distributed hardwood of North America. The color is uniformly dark rich brown. The grain is usually straight, but occasionally shows patterns of waves, ripples, or curls. Walnut is similar to cherry in both weight and feel. The two woods are excellent choices when considering a pair of matched shuttles of different colors. Walnut takes an excellent hard, smooth finish.

Maples grow extensively throughout North America The grain is usually straight, but occasionally develops curls and waves (tiger maple or curly maple), or patterns of small tight swirls (birdseye maple). The wood is creamy white, very fine textured, and takes an exceptional glossy polish.

White Ash grows throughout eastern North America and is used extensively for sports equipment, tool handles, cabinets, and furniture. It is usually light tan but occasionally shows darker mottling and black streaks. The wood is usually straight-grained with well-defined growth rings. The texture is somewhat coarse, but ash finishes smoothly, polishes to a fine luster, and gets ever smoother with use.

Hickory is a common deciduous tree, with 12 varieties native to the United States, four found in Canada and four in Mexico. Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish brown while its outer sapwood is white to cream. Hickory wood is very hard, very stiff, very dense and very shock resistant. It is used for tool handles, bows, wheel spokes, carts, drumsticks, lacrosse stick handles, golf club shafts, the bottom of skis, walking sticks and paddles. Chips of hickory wood are frequently used for barbeque flavoring.

Brazilian Cherry or Jatoba is a tree common to the Caribbean, Central, and South America. It is not a cherry tree and it is in no way related to American Black Cherry. The wood is typically a tan or salmon color with black accent stripes that over time turns to a deep rich red color.It is very hard, somewhat irridescent and takes a high polish. Jatoba is frequently used for furniture and flooring.

Bubinga, also known as African rosewood, grows to massive size in the tropical forests of Central and West Africa. This tree commonly yields boards over four feet wide. The wood is medium red-brown with veining of reds and sometimes purple. The grain is often irregular and shows a variety of attractive patterns. Bubinga is very hard, very dense, and has a fine texture that polishes to a high gloss.


We are always on the lookout for interesting woods, especially woods with striking color or great figure. So, we frequently have other woods available in limited quantities.

For information about special woods currently available, click here.


Please Note:

  • Ski shuttle runners are available in cherry, ash, walnut, hickory and maple. The runners are steam-bent, and only these five woods are suitable for steam-bending. The central rib of the ski shuttle can be made from any wood that we have available.
  • Boat shuttles, including end-feed shuttles, are available in all woods except where noted.
  • Swedish-style shuttles, super slim shuttles and poke shuttles are available in any wood we currently have in stock.
  • The wood you select can significantly affect a shuttle’s weight. If shuttle weight is a concern, please see the comparative weight list below as a guide to choosing a wood with an appropriate weight for you.
  • Every tree is different, and even boards from the same tree can have very different color and figure. We do our best to select the best lumber, and then cut it for the best appearance. To see samples of the color and figure possible in a wood, it is best to search Google Images for the wood by its common name.

RELATIVE WOOD WEIGHTS

Woods are list lightest to heaviest, top to bottom. Not all woods on this list are available at all times.

Light Weight

Tiger Maple
American Black Cherry

Medium Weight

Black Walnut
White Ash
Rock Maple
Hickory

Heavy Weight

Wenge
Amazique
Bubinga
Leopardwood
Brazilian Cherry